Announcing expanded Indigenous collaboration for Les Filles du Roi

Canada Council funding supports collaboration with Mohawk community

Co-creators Julie McIsaac and Corey Payette in a reconstructed Iroquois long-house circa 1450 in Tsiionhiakwatha Archeaological Site, Saint-Anicet, Quebec. Thanks to Michel Cadieux (Archaeologist) for his hosting.

Co-creators Julie McIsaac and Corey Payette in a reconstructed Iroquois long-house circa 1450 in Tsiionhiakwatha Archeaological Site, Saint-Anicet, Quebec. Thanks to Michel Cadieux (Archaeologist) for his hosting.

First-time funding from the Canada Council allowed Fugue Theatre Society to support co-creators Julie McIsaac and Corey Payette in research that took place in Quebec and New York State this September. There, they began a collaboration process with Mohawk community and Elders to expand Indigenous input in the development of the upcoming trilingual musical, Les Filles du Roi. This work marks a significant step forward for Fugue Theatre by directly linking the company’s drive for artistic excellence with its mandate to promote equity and diversity within Canadian theatre. 

Funding from the Canada Council supports the overall development of the show. As the project continues, it will allow Fugue to hire a Quebec-based Indigenous outreach coordinator. Their role will be to provide guidance on Mohawk cultural protocols, prepare relationships with community and to seek potential collaborators, such as language experts, story keepers and Elders. Indigenous composer\playwright\actor Corey Payette followed a similar process with the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc in the development of his musical, Children of God, which premiers at the National Arts Centre in 2017.  In continuing their research, the artistic team hopes to incorporate Mohawk language into the script to create a trilingual musical.

A concert presentation is scheduled for November 4 & 5th at The Annex Theatre in Vancouver, and will include talk-backs from community.